Randy Eminger UGA

UGA talks America’s Energy Future with Randy Eminger!

As the country debates the Obama administration’s Clean Power Plan, collegians at the University of Georgia invited Randy Eminger, the South Vice-President for over 20 years of the ACCCE (American Coalition for Clean Coal Electricity) to discuss the future of American energy.

IMG_1670The Clean Power Plan is an initiative by the Environmental Protection Agency to require that states reduce their utilities’ carbon dioxide emissions an average of 32% below 2005 levels by 2030. This, of course, is designed to be met by pursuing renewable energy, such as solar and wind.

Eminger pointed out that such initiatives will do nothing more than harm the poorest Americans. “In States like California, that have pursued similar plans to the CPP, people pay electricity bills that are 50% higher than people in Georgia,” Eminger explained. “In Georgia, 24% of low income households went without food for at least one day in response to high energy bills.”

“It was fascinating to learn how conservative energy policies can have such a positive and meaningful effect on families across the nation,” student Amber Webb commented. “Conservative, practical energy solutions are key to efficiently maintaining a clean and safe environment in modern America.”IMG_5714 (1)

Eminger also showed the students that according to the EPA’s own analysis, the CPP will only decrease temperatures by 0.016 degrees Fahrenheit. “Does making a poor family go hungry for that seem worth it? It certainly doesn’t to me,” Eminger added.

UGA collegians also were exposed to the truth that as coal based electric generation has increased, harmful emissions have decreased significantly over the last 30 years. This is because power plants are continuing to develop technological superior means of containing and scrubbing emissions as the years go by.

The presentation was part of CFACT’s Keep Calm Climate Changes campaign, which aims to bring awareness to the facts behind renewable energy and climate change.

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